Salvage Division name?

BUTUZ

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BUTUZ
You know, a good portion of the Western seaboard of North America calls a trawler, a troller.
Same acronym, plus some additional meanings
I mean mericans cant speak propa English full stop. Tomaytoe Alumunmuminum etc.
 

Vavrik

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As I'm from Canada, living in Texas - I have to agree with that article. North American accents are as diverse as they are in the UK and Ireland, but span far more distance in both time and space. The article talks about Shakespeare - there is still a region in North America where someone from Shakespeare's time in England would be comfortable with the accent of the rural population.

But at the same time, Americans - what's a Smartie?
 

Thalstan

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As I'm from Canada, living in Texas - I have to agree with that article. North American accents are as diverse as they are in the UK and Ireland, but span far more distance in both time and space. The article talks about Shakespeare - there is still a region in North America where someone from Shakespeare's time in England would be comfortable with the accent of the rural population.

But at the same time, Americans - what's a Smartie?
A Smartie is a piece of candy similar to a sweet tart.
It's also a pejorative when applied to a person...similar to a know it all
 
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Thalstan

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lol nope. That's what Canadians call a rocket.

I'll give you a hint from like 1979 or something. "When you eat your smarties, do you eat the red ones last?"
ummm no idea...M&Ms, or Skittles?

Trust me, I am well aware that two different...potentially similar things can be CLEARLY different.
Muster cheese in the US is a semi-soft cheese distinguished by a white/cream colored interior, and an orange skin that has cheesecloth impressions in it.
In West Germany (maybe Europe in general), it is a REALLY funky smelling cheese. To me, it smelled like old, used, sweatsocks that had been left in a plastic bag to ferment for a few months/years.

Guess how I found that out...
 

Vavrik

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ummm no idea...M&Ms
Hehe, yep like M&M's, but made with slightly different ingredients. When my wife (a Texan) and I go to Canada, she buys 5 pounds of the stuff, and she doesn't eat M&M's anymore.

Kind off topic isn't it... sorry :) (In context, that has roughly the same meaning as when my kids say, "Sorry, not sorry")

Muster cheese in the US is a semi-soft cheese distinguished by a white/cream colored interior, and an orange skin that has cheesecloth impressions in it.
In West Germany (maybe Europe in general), it is a REALLY funky smelling cheese. To me, it smelled like old, used, sweatsocks that had been left in a plastic bag to ferment for a few months/years.
Limburger cheese originates in Germany and is one of my favorites. That definitely smells like over ripe gym socks - but it's taste is phantastic!
Munster cheese is related to a lot of cheeses from Northern Europe including most blue cheeses. It originates from what used to be the kingdom of Lotharingia - which the Netherlands was a part of.
I was born in Lorraine, which is part of the French region that was part of Lotharingia, so I grew up with a lot of this stuff.
 
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