Coronavirus COVID-19 Thread

Jolly_Green_Giant

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I have 2 childhood friends who I talk with and play video games with pretty much every day and have done so for many years. We don't get into politics because we all just have different views and ultimately we don't care. Well, Idk how It got brought up but they ended up telling me that theyre both not vaccinated. I asked why, and the answer I got was the same I got from my mom and my sister. It's an inconvenience. They're not scared, they want to get the shot, but they're too damn lazy to make the time to go get it.

Another story: My neighbor was a geriatric nurse for 28 years, and she absolutely refuses to get the shot. Her reasoning is that you don't know what's going to happen in the long run with these viruses / vaccines and for all we know it's altering out DNA. We had another neighbor, a good friend of hers pass not long ago of a heart attack and apparently it was within a day or two of getting her covid shot. So naturally the nurse neighbor is pointing to that as a reason not to get the shot as well.

It's a mixed bag of responses across the board it seems.
 

NaffNaffBobFace

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COVID corner - Some articles from around the world from today, Sunday 12th of September:

- World: Global Confirmed 224,506,271 - Global Deaths 4,628,445

- UK: England vaccine passport plans ditched

- UK: Spitfire emblazoned with 6,500 names to thank NHS

- Sri Lanka:
Sri Lanka faces food shortages

- New Zealand: New Zealand buys half a million vaccine doses from Denmark

- China: reported 46 new Covid-19 cases on the mainland

- Germany: Angela Merkel implored Germans on Sunday to make use of a week-long Covid-19 vaccination campaign

- UK: UK health secretary: we will get Christmas this year "I’m not anticipating any more lockdowns. I think it’d be irresponsible for any health minister around the world to take take everything off the table, but you know I just don’t see how we get to another lockdown.”

 
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Radegast74

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they ended up telling me that theyre both not vaccinated. I asked why, and the answer I got was the same I got from my mom and my sister. It's an inconvenience. They're not scared, they want to get the shot, but they're too damn lazy to make the time to go get it.
That's actually a huge problem...just telling people it is "the right thing to do" & that it is free, and/or telling them to go to Walgreens/CVS whatever (stores I *never* go to) isn't going to work.

They need to do outreach/marketing/whatever. If this was a private firm and they could make money off it, you would see "pop-up" vaccination sites all over the place, so that it would not be an inconvenience. I mean, why does everybody order from Amazon: you don't have to get up off your ass to order, and you get it delivered right to you. There is a reason why Bezos is such a billionaire --> we really like convenience!
 

NaffNaffBobFace

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I have 2 childhood friends who I talk with and play video games with pretty much every day and have done so for many years. We don't get into politics because we all just have different views and ultimately we don't care. Well, Idk how It got brought up but they ended up telling me that theyre both not vaccinated. I asked why, and the answer I got was the same I got from my mom and my sister. It's an inconvenience. They're not scared, they want to get the shot, but they're too damn lazy to make the time to go get it.

Another story: My neighbor was a geriatric nurse for 28 years, and she absolutely refuses to get the shot. Her reasoning is that you don't know what's going to happen in the long run with these viruses / vaccines and for all we know it's altering out DNA. We had another neighbor, a good friend of hers pass not long ago of a heart attack and apparently it was within a day or two of getting her covid shot. So naturally the nurse neighbor is pointing to that as a reason not to get the shot as well.

It's a mixed bag of responses across the board it seems.
That's actually a huge problem...just telling people it is "the right thing to do" & that it is free, and/or telling them to go to Walgreens/CVS whatever (stores I *never* go to) isn't going to work.

They need to do outreach/marketing/whatever. If this was a private firm and they could make money off it, you would see "pop-up" vaccination sites all over the place, so that it would not be an inconvenience. I mean, why does everybody order from Amazon: you don't have to get up off your ass to order, and you get it delivered right to you. There is a reason why Bezos is such a billionaire --> we really like convenience!
I don't know how it's working in the US - Here in the UK I was text messaged by my GP (General Practitioner, all people in the UK are allocated one as we are all registered with the NHS except when you're not) with a link to a website I could book a time and date. I of course chose the next available time/place. I then asked my boss if I could book the time off, they said no problem, they treated it like a medical appointment day.

No inconvenience and I got the day off work 👍 How does it work over there?
 
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Vavrik

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How does it work over there?
Kind of similar, except a lot of people don't get paid time off. I mean a lot do, but a lot don't. But no appointment is required, and if you have medical insurance they record the number if you want. [1] If you don't, no problem. [2] You get a card that records when you got the jab.

[1] I don't think the Government centers do this. Just private pharmacies.
[2] The information IS reported to your insurance company though... which is something I think is going to be used to calculate your insurance rates. If the insurance company already knows your vaccination status, good. Otherwise you might have to prove it. Not quite sure when or how, but that's what I think could happen.

Someone who's living in Canada right now might have more information. I think In Canada it's pretty much like the UK. But I don't qualify for Canadian healthcare right now, and would need 3 months of private health care if I was to move there. Fortunately the insurance company I use in the US is one of the insurance companies that you can do that with.
 

NaffNaffBobFace

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Kind of similar, except a lot of people don't get paid time off. I mean a lot do, but a lot don't.
Early on in the vaccination drive there was a scandal when one or two companies reportedly denied staff medical appointment leave and nipped that in the bud quite quickly for most of the rest of them. Don't know if all employers would pay for the whole day or even just a few hours but denying the appointment at all put them over a barrel.

Any others would certainly be held liable if the staff member then caught COVID-19 with all costs of the victims death/illness/14 day isolation being lumped on their table rather than being able to use the Pandemic Relief that has been made available for businesses to cover that expense, if they were the cause for them not being able to go for vaccination.

And added to the above, a lot of centres are also open 8am to 8pm now so options are much more accessible too.

All that said, I'm sure there are still some UK residents who would still find it inconvenient even if their boss gave them week off paid to get the jab :-)
 
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Aramsolari

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That's actually a huge problem...just telling people it is "the right thing to do" & that it is free, and/or telling them to go to Walgreens/CVS whatever (stores I *never* go to) isn't going to work.

They need to do outreach/marketing/whatever. If this was a private firm and they could make money off it, you would see "pop-up" vaccination sites all over the place, so that it would not be an inconvenience. I mean, why does everybody order from Amazon: you don't have to get up off your ass to order, and you get it delivered right to you. There is a reason why Bezos is such a billionaire --> we really like convenience!
Yeah this is probably the same crowd as the guys who couldn't be arsed to vote. They always use the same excuse...."My vote doesn't matter, or "I don't particularly like any of those guys". In this case it's more of a "Nah I don't think I'll get sick". It's always that exceptionalism like they're special.

Many people are just lazy to the point that it basically boils down to chronic apathy. Not much you can do about it I suppose.

I guess having incentives doesn't hurt, like lottery pools or gifts or whatever. Sad that it's come down to that.
 

NaffNaffBobFace

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Yeah this is probably the same crowd as the guys who couldn't be arsed to vote. They always use the same excuse...."My vote doesn't matter, or "I don't particularly like any of those guys". In this case it's more of a "Nah I don't think I'll get sick". It's always that exceptionalism like they're special.

Many people are just lazy to the point that it basically boils down to chronic apathy. Not much you can do about it I suppose.

I guess having incentives doesn't hurt, like lottery pools or gifts or whatever. Sad that it's come down to that.
I always found it ironic some places put a lottery in as a vaccine incentive - so you have a 2 in 100 chance of dying from COVID but hey here's this lottery in which you have a 1 in 1,000,000 chance of winning... Yeah, no.

Tell you what, give me the cheaper $3 vaccine and let me have the difference between that and the most expensive one you were going to give me. $17 in my pocket yes please. Two doses and I get paid $34? Line my pockets, dudes, line my pockets!
 

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Another study coming from the UK for the first 6 months of 2021 confirming the stats we have been seeing.

99% of COVID deaths are unvaccinated people:

"Of the 51,281 deaths involving COVID in England between 2 January and 2 July, 640 (1.2%) were people who had received both vaccine doses. "

 

Aramsolari

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Another study coming from the UK for the first 6 months of 2021 confirming the stats we have been seeing.

99% of COVID deaths are unvaccinated people:

"Of the 51,281 deaths involving COVID in England between 2 January and 2 July, 640 (1.2%) were people who had received both vaccine doses. "

If the unvaccinated just suddenly dropped dead, it wouldn’t be that bad….callous though that may be. The issue is that COVID is a virus that hits you over a course of weeks. Unvaxxed patients end up in ICUs and tie up valuable hospital resources straining our already overstrained health care system.

In a way, that’s what makes this virus so potent. It kills but isn’t lethal enough to convince people to take the appropriate measures to protect themselves. I mean if COVID is as deadly as Ebola, we probably wouldn’t have this conversation. People would be jumping over each other to get the shot.
 

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If the unvaccinated just suddenly dropped dead, it wouldn’t be that bad….callous though that may be. The issue is that COVID is a virus that hits you over a course of weeks. Unvaxxed patients end up in ICUs and tie up valuable hospital resources straining our already overstrained health care system.

In a way, that’s what makes this virus so potent. It kills but isn’t lethal enough to convince people to take the appropriate measures to protect themselves. I mean if COVID is as deadly as Ebola, we probably wouldn’t have this conversation. People would be jumping over each other to get the shot.
Don't jinx 2021 man....

Last thing we need are people roaming streets bleeding out of every pore or hole in their body.
 

NaffNaffBobFace

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COVID Corner - Some reports from around the world from today, Monday 13th of September:

- World: Global Confirmed 224,960,083 - Global Deaths 4,635,218

- US: Confirmed 41,028,341

- UK: Top medics back single jabs for healthy 12 to 15-year-olds

- UK: Scraps contract for Valneva vaccine

- UK: 300,000 suspected of breaking travel quarantine

- UK: Scotland: £11m of unused PPE shipped to Africa

- World: Médecins Sans Frontières says waiver would allow faster production

- US: senators condemn Amazon for promoting anti-vaxxer books

- UK: Only 1% of Covid-19 deaths in UK among vaccinated

- Philippines: Philippines facing ‘learning crisis’, says Unicef

- Australia: Majority of Australians would be comfortable with venues requiring patrons to be vaccinated as a condition of entry

- China: imposed new restrictions in the south-eastern Fujian province

- France: The number of hospitalised patients in France dropped below 10,000 for the first time since mid-August

- Therapeutics: The antiviral drug being developed by pharmaceutical company Merck & Co to treat Covid-19 could be approved by the end of the year

 
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Radegast74

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Another one of those sad stories we are going to see more of, esp. in certain areas...a 73 year old with heart problems had to be airlifted to another state, because the 43 other hospitals they tried to transfer him to didn't have an available cardiac bed. Needless to say, the delay probably was what killed him:
 

Bambooza

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Another one of those sad stories we are going to see more of, esp. in certain areas...a 73 year old with heart problems had to be airlifted to another state, because the 43 other hospitals they tried to transfer him to didn't have an available cardiac bed. Needless to say, the delay probably was what killed him:
I would be careful of these stories. While Alabama is experiencing a large number of ICU beds being used by covid patients the added issue is a lot of the regional hospitals do not have the medical facilities to treat medical emergencies like this and at the bottom of the NPR article on the subject they do say so as well. It could be those other higher-tier hospitals closer to Cullman were turning away patients due to no ICU beds being available but that has not been shown to be true or false as of the moment. I have brought this up before that a lot of the rural American hospitals simply do not have ICU beds and or lack the medical staff and that this was an issue prior to even ACA, PPACA, or “Obamacare” and seems to continue to accelerate in the reduction of services at this hospitals if they even stay open. So it's standard procedure to bring them into a regional hospital to stabilize them and then find an available bed/services and airlift them there. Covid has not changed the fact that a lot of these patients simply die before they can even arrive at hospitals suitable to possibly saving their life nor is it a guarantee that they would have their live saved even if they where in a city with the medical facilities and staff.

A Cullman Regional Medical Center spokesperson, who declined to give specifics of Ray DeMonia's case, citing privacy concerns, confirmed to NPR that he was transferred from the hospital but said the reason was that he required "a higher level of specialized care not available" there.
 

NaffNaffBobFace

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a lot of the regional hospitals do not have the medical facilities to treat medical emergencies like this
I don't know the specifics of this case, however take a look at the other cities within the same distance which would have been a more obvious choice to contact and would, one would have thought, have had good facilities for just such an emergency as a cardiac incident: Nashville, Atlanta, Jacksonville, Columbus, Birmingham, Memphis, Huntsville, Chattanooga... I can see how they'd have got on to contacting 40+ places if they had hit up the most obvious city facilities before checking in with smaller places like Meridian.

As I said, I don't know specifics, but if you draw a circle around Cullman 200 miles either side, there are a lot of big places to choose from...

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